Magnificent mummy in just 3 colours

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As many of you are aware, the September painting challenge has been to use only 3 pots of paint. I think the toughest part of this challenge is picking the right model and combination of colours.

Edward Nicholson has taken photos of his entry every step of the way, to show us just how he’s painted his mummy.

The deadline for this challenge is September 27th, so there is still time to take part. Over to Edward…

Shadow grey, Bone and Devlan mud - all thats need to paint a mummy

Shadow grey, Bone and Devlan mud - all that's need to paint a mummy

With this month’s challenge being to use only three pots of paint I decided to paint a mini that wouldn’t require too much effort on my part. This is mainly because I have never tried limiting my colour palette so severely before and I will be using the mini for gaming, so it still had to look respectable.

Mummy

Under coated with Bone

With this in mind I chose an old mummy from Heroquest as it would really only need two main colours, bone for the badages and shadow grey as a base for the rotting flesh. I then chose a wash as my third pot. The wash I decided on was GW’s Devlan Mud as it is good at adding shading to many different colours and this would be it’s sole use on this mini.

I undercoated the mini with bone, using two thin coats of paint to prevent the paint filling in the details. I find very thin paint to be absolutly essential when painting plastic minis as the details are never as sharp as on metal minis. After the undercoat had dried I proceeded to block in all of the flesh areas with a couple of thin coats of Shadow Grey.

Painting the flesh

Painting the flesh with Shadow Grey

Next I gave the mini a very liberal wash with the Devlan Mud, making sure to cover the entire mini (including the flesh areas). I then repeated this once the first wash had dried. This ensured that all of the recesses would have a fairly even amount of the wash pigment and would also provide the contrast that would be required against the paler coloured bandages.

Adding a wash of Devlan mud

Adding a wash of Devlan mud

Re-apply Shadow Grey to flesh

Re-apply Shadow Grey to flesh

After this had dried I reapplied some shadow grey to the flesh areas, leaving the wash in place in the recesses. I then started to look at highlighting the flesh areas, so to this end I added a small amount of bone into some Shadow grey (no exact ratios here I had some Shadow Grey thinned on the pallette and just added in a brushful of bone for each subsequent highlight layer) and highlighted the flesh areas. I used five seperate highlight layers in total (you can use more but I find five to be about right on smaller areas such as the face), each time just adding a small amount of bone into the paint I had mixed.

Highlight flesh with Bone + Shadow Grey

Highlight flesh with Bone + Shadow Grey

Additional highlight to flesh

Additional highlight to flesh

Picking out flesh details with stronger highlight

Picking out flesh details with stronger highlight

Final extreme highlight to flesh

Final extreme highlight to flesh

I now turned my attention to the bandages. I had thought about mixing some bone and Devlan mud together and layering it on, working up to pure bone. I decided against this though as the bone colour I was using is very light in tone and would have looked too clean and crisp on a mummy that has been rotting for many years. So I layered some bone straight on, taking care to avoid the recesses that had been shaded with wash. I deliberately kept the paint thin enough that it would not dry evenly and only applied a single layer. This was quite time consuming but would help with the look of the mini once finished.

Adding Bone to the bandages

Adding Bone to the bandages

Next came yet another wash with Devlan Mud, again across the whole mini. This worked to blend the highlights on the flesh together and to provide a mid tone on the bandages.

A wash of Devlan mud ties it all together

A wash of Devlan mud ties it all together

As a final step, I gave the bandages a very light drybrush of bone. Though perhaps the term drybrush is a little misleading in this case, as I the paint was still very watery. However I simply carried on regardless, wiping away most of the excess paint until only a tracery of it remained when I brushed the bristles across my hand. I worked from the top of the mini to the bottom in long strokes. Always moving downwards like this helps gve the effect of light illuminating the tops of the bandage edges.

A light drybrush of Bone over the bandages

A light drybrush of Bone over the bandages

I then used some wood ballast to texture the base. This was applied with some PVA glue mixed with a little water. I then applied another layer of PVA and water after the base had dried, to help seal the wood ballast for painting.

Undercoat the base with Shadow Grey & Devlan Mud

Undercoat the base with Shadow Grey & Devlan Mud

After this had dried fully I undercoated the base with a mix of Shadow grey and devlan mud. At this point I wasn’t entirley sure how I could acheive the look I wanted with the paints I had limited myself to.

Making the base look more earthen

Making the base look more earthen

I decided that I would try and make the base itself look like some sort of glazed earthernware,a rich brown in colour. So I went about painting the base rim and any parts of it that were showing through the texturing, with a bit of bone mixed with a little devlan mud. Once this had dried I gave the whole base a wash of Devlan mud.

A wash over the base

A wash over the base

I realised at this point that if I wanted a glazed look I would have to add something to the devlan mud. The washes dry matt and that wouldn’t do. So I added in some devlan mud to a bit of acrylic medium. The medium I used is just a cheap one (it cost me £1.50 from The Works), and is for artists rather than mini painting. That said it still has it’s uses and is quite a bargain for the amount you get. It does several things when added to paint, namely it increases translucency and adds a gloss finish. When I added the wash I used primarily as pigmentation for the medium. This made a kind of “paint” if you will which I applied to the whole base. Doing this meant that the wash built up all over the base, rather than just in the recesses. The medium dries clear but helps disperse the pigment from the devlan mud more evenly. It’s weird and the pics probably explain better than I ever could.

Adding the acrylic medium

Adding the acrylic medium

With the tile looking close to how I wanted it, I decided to work out how to do the dust or debris that was covering the tile. I decided to drybrush it to bring out the texture and started with shadow grey. I then kept adding in some bone to lighten it up and kept drybrushing it on, lighter and lighter. Then I added a very light drybrush of pure bone.

Shadow Grey on the base debris

Shadow Grey on the base debris

Adding Bone to highlight the debris

Adding Bone to highlight the debris

Further Bone highlight

Further Bone highlight

Extreme highlight

Extreme highlight

Fine drybrush of Bone

Fine drybrush of Bone

At this point it was looking rather blue and the floor tile below still didn’t look quite right. So to correct this I gave the whole base another wash with the devlan mud/acrylic medium mix. This helped blanket the blue with brown and produce a more natural look.

Final wash to tie it all together

Final wash to tie it all together

Reverse of model

Reverse of model

That’s it finished 😉

Finished Mummy

Finished Mummy

If you want to see more entries from the September Painting Challenge, you’ve not long to wait. The deadline is Sunday 27th September, and the voting will start on Monday 28th. Check back here to cast your vote.

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2 Responses to “Magnificent mummy in just 3 colours”

  1. angel Says:

    Hi, great result!!! I was wandering if you can tell me the brand of this “hobby paint” bone color.

    Thanks

    • sheffieldirregulars Says:

      I believe it was Citadel paints from Games Workshop being used – but I will get Ed to confirm.

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